Wage & Hour

  • June 28, 2024

    Chevron's End Is Just The Start For Energized Agency Foes

    By knocking down a powerful precedent that has towered over administrative law for 40 years, the U.S. Supreme Court's right wing Friday gave a crowning achievement to anti-agency attorneys. But for those attorneys, the achievement is merely a means to an end, and experts expect a litigation blitzkrieg to materialize quickly in the aftermath.

  • June 28, 2024

    In Chevron Case, Justices Trade One Unknown For Another

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overrule a decades-old judicial deference doctrine may cause the "eternal fog of uncertainty" surrounding federal agency actions to dissipate and level the playing field in challenges of government policies, but lawyers warn it raises new questions over what rules courts must follow and how judges will implement them.

  • June 28, 2024

    PAGA Reforms Clear Calif. Assembly, Head To Newsom's Desk

    California legislators in both the Senate and Assembly overwhelmingly backed big changes to California's Private Attorneys General Act, including an adjustment to how penalties are assessed to employers and awarded to employees, sending the package to Gov. Gavin Newsom's desk.

  • June 28, 2024

    Texas Justices Back Union Leave Clause's Constitutionality

    A clause in a firefighters union's collective bargaining agreement that permits taking paid leave for negotiations does not violate the Lone Star state's constitution, the Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday while reversing an award of attorney fees and sanctions against some of the plaintiffs.

  • June 28, 2024

    Justices' Chevron Ruling Threatens DOL Wage Rulemaking

    The Supreme Court’s ruling Friday nixing the Chevron doctrine of deference to a federal agency's reasonable interpretation of a law could give the government a tougher time defending wage and hour rules in court, attorneys said. Here, Law360 explores the expected impact.

  • June 28, 2024

    NYC Realty Co. Defeats Most Of Building Super's Wage Claims

    A New York realty group secured early wins on all but one of a building superintendent's wage claims, with a New York federal judge ruling Friday the worker had provided scant evidence in support, but the group must face claims related to wage deficits caused by a time clock malfunction.

  • June 28, 2024

    Ex-Copywriter's Misclassification Suit Goes To Arbitration

    A former copywriter must arbitrate her suit claiming that a media company misclassified her as an independent contractor because the agreement she signed delegates any arbitrability issues to an arbitrator, a Michigan federal judge ruled Friday.

  • June 28, 2024

    Nationwide Cert. Rejected In Suit Over Stolen Curaleaf Tips

    An Illinois federal judge conditionally certified a class of Curaleaf hourly employees in Illinois, Arizona and Massachusetts, but denied a bid to certify a nationwide class of all Curaleaf hourly employees "based on pure speculation," in a suit alleging managers at its cannabis dispensary locations around the country stole the contents of tip jars.

  • June 28, 2024

    Tesla Laid Off 14K Workers Without Notice, WARN Suit Says

    Tesla Inc. laid off approximately 14,000 employees without giving them a fair warning required under both federal and California law, a former parts advisor alleges in a putative class action seeking back pay and penalties on the automotive company.

  • June 28, 2024

    Cleaning Service Co. Can't Force Contractors Into Wage Case

    A Texas-based commercial cleaning company can't force workers to add additional defendants to their lawsuit alleging the company used subcontractors to avoid paying overtime wages, a Colorado federal judge ruled, even if the company believes the workers are suing the wrong entity.

  • June 28, 2024

    State And Local W&H Laws That Are Going Into Effect July 1

    This summer domestic workers in New Jersey will be entitled to breaks, while minors in Florida will be allowed to work longer hours. Here, Law360 explores these and other new wage and hour laws across the country that go into effect July 1.

  • June 28, 2024

    DOL, Concession Stand Co. Settle Retaliation Suit

    A concession stand company in Pittsburgh will pay $15,000 to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it threatened and retaliated against H-2B temporary workers during an agency probe into the company, according to papers filed Friday in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • June 28, 2024

    Ex-Waitresses Say Ga. Sports Bar Didn't Pay Full Wages

    The owners and operator of a Georgia restaurant required waitresses to share their tips with workers not eligible to receive them and failed to pay overtime and minimum wage, two former employees said in a proposed collective action in federal court.

  • June 28, 2024

    Morgan Lewis Employment Litigator Jumps To Vedder Price

    Vedder Price has hired an employment litigator from Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP as a shareholder in its Chicago office, the firm announced Friday.

  • June 28, 2024

    Food Distributors Tell 2nd Circ. No Arbitration For Suit

    A misclassification suit that went to the U.S. Supreme Court should stay out of arbitration, two food distributors told the Second Circuit, arguing that a slew of rulings supported their arguments that they should be considered transportation workers.

  • June 28, 2024

    Surgical Techs, Hospital Agree To Settle Off-Clock Wage Suit

    Two surgical technicians and a hospital network settled a class action wage suit and asked a California federal judge to send the suit back to state court for final approval of the deal, where a related Private Attorneys General Act case has been pending.

  • June 28, 2024

    High Court Enters July With 3 Rulings To Go

    In a rare move, the U.S. Supreme Court will issue opinions into the beginning of July as the court tries to clear its merits docket of three remaining cases dealing with presidential immunity, whether governments can control social media platforms' content moderation policies and the appropriate deadline to challenge agency action. 

  • June 28, 2024

    Supreme Court Strikes Down Chevron Deference

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday overturned a decades-old precedent that instructed judges about when they could defer to federal agencies' interpretations of law in rulemaking, depriving courts of a commonly used analytic tool and leaving lots of questions about what comes next.

  • June 27, 2024

    Uber, Lyft Cut $175M Deal To End Mass. Worker Status Fight

    Uber Technologies Inc. and Lyft Inc. on Thursday agreed to pay a combined $175 million and provide drivers with a suite of benefits to settle an employee classification lawsuit brought by the state of Massachusetts.

  • June 27, 2024

    11th Circ. Upholds Radiology Practice's FMLA Suit Win

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday backed a Florida radiology practice's defeat of a doctor's lawsuit alleging he was fired because he requested medical leave, ruling a lower court didn't err when it blocked him from presenting evidence he hadn't previously disclosed.

  • June 27, 2024

    Austin Public Utility Co. Can't Defuse Wage Suit

    A power utility run by the City of Austin, Texas, can't dodge allegations that it purposely failed to pay a former customer service representative overtime premiums even though she regularly worked 50 hours a week, with a federal judge finding Thursday that she brought enough evidence to keep her claims in play.

  • June 27, 2024

    DOL Says It Put Salary Levels In OT Carveout Since 1938

    The U.S. Department of Labor told a Texas federal court it included a minimum salary aspect in executive, administrative or professional rules since the Fair Labor Standards Act's inception, arguing a marketing firm doesn't have the basis to halt a final overtime rule.

  • June 27, 2024

    Ala. Adult Care Co. Owes $202K For Wage Violations

    The owner of two adult care homes in Alabama will pay nearly $202,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying workers their full wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Thursday.

  • June 27, 2024

    Lewis Brisbois Adds Employment Atty In Nevada

    Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP announced that a labor and employment attorney with more than 40 years of experience has joined the firm's Reno, Nevada, office as a partner.

  • June 27, 2024

    Ga. School District, Bus Drivers Settle OT Bonus Suit

    A Georgia school district agreed to pay nearly $114,000 to end a collective action accusing it of underpaying employees on overtime by failing to include a retention bonus when calculating their time-and-a-half rate, according to a motion to approve the deal filed in federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • East Penn Verdict Is An FLSA Cautionary Tale For Employers

    Author Photo

    A Pennsylvania federal jury's recent $22 million verdict against East Penn set a record for the Fair Labor Standards Act and should serve as a reminder to employers that failure to keep complete wage and hour records can exponentially increase liability exposure under the FLSA, say Benjamin Hinks and Danielle Lederman at Bowditch & Dewey.

  • Pay Transparency Laws Complicate Foreign Labor Cert.

    Author Photo

    State and local laws adopted to help close the gender pay gap pose challenges for U.S. companies recruiting foreign nationals, as they try to navigate a thicket of pay transparency laws without running afoul of federally regulated recruitment practices, say Stephanie Pimentel and Asha George at Berry Appleman.

  • 2 Ways Calif. Justices' PAGA Ruling May Play Out

    Author Photo

    In Adolph v. Uber, the California Supreme Court will soon decide whether an employee’s representative Private Attorneys General Act claims can stay in court when their individual claims go to arbitration — either exposing employers to battles in multiple forums, or affirming arbitration agreements’ ability to extinguish nonindividual claims, says Justin Peters at Carlton Fields.

  • How To Navigate Class Incentive Awards After Justices' Denial

    Author Photo

    Despite a growing circuit split on the permissibility of incentive awards, the U.S. Supreme Court recently declined to hear cases on the issue, meaning class action defendants must consider whether to agree to incentive awards as part of a classwide settlement and how to best structure the agreement, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Check Onboarding Docs To Protect Arbitration Agreements

    Author Photo

    The California Court of Appeal's recent Alberto v. Cambrian Homecare decision opens a new and unexpected avenue of attack on employment arbitration agreements in California — using other employment-related agreements to render otherwise enforceable arbitration agreements unenforceable, say Morgan Forsey and Ian Michalak at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Remote Work Considerations In A Post-Pandemic World

    Author Photo

    Now that the public health emergency has ended, employers may reevaluate their obligations to allow remote work, as well as the extent to which they must compensate remote working expenses, though it's important to examine any requests under the Americans With Disabilities Act, say Dan Kaplan and Jacqueline Hayduk at Foley & Lardner.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Remote Work Policies

    Author Photo

    Implementing a remote work policy that clearly articulates eligibility, conduct and performance expectations for remote employees can ease employers’ concerns about workers they may not see on a daily basis, says Melissa Spence at Butler Snow.

  • An Overview Of Calif. Berman Hearings For Wage Disputes

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    While California's Berman hearings are pro-employee procedures that are accessible, informal and affordable mechanisms for parties filing a claim to recover unpaid wages, there are some disadvantages to the process such as delays, says David Cheng at FordHarrison.

  • No Blank Space In Case Law On Handling FMLA Abuse

    Author Photo

    Daniel Schwartz at Shipman & Goodwin discusses real-world case law that guides employers on how to handle suspected Family and Medical Leave Act abuse, specifically in instances where employees attended or performed in a concert while on leave — with Taylor Swift’s ongoing Eras Tour as a hypothetical backdrop.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Bias Lessons From 'Partner Track'

    Author Photo

    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with CyberRisk Alliance's Ying Wong, about how Netflix's show "Partner Track" tackles conscious and unconscious bias at law firms, and offer some key observations for employers and their human resources departments on avoiding these biases.

  • History Supports 2nd Circ. View Of FAA Transport Exemption

    Author Photo

    In the circuit split over when transport workers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, sparked by the 2022 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Southwest Airlines v. Saxon, the Second Circuit reached a more faithful interpretation — one supported by historical litigation and legislative context, though perhaps arrived at via the wrong route, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Employers Need Clarity On FLSA Joint Employer Liability

    Author Photo

    A judicial patchwork of multifactor tests to determine joint employment liability has led to unpredictable results, and only congressional action or enactment of a uniform standard to which courts will consistently defer can give employers the clarity needed to structure their relationships with workers, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. Independent Contractor Lessons From Grubhub Suit

    Author Photo

    California courts have been creating little in the way of clarity when it comes to the employment status of gig workers — and a recent federal court decision in Lawson v. Grubhub illustrates how status may change with the winds of litigation, offering four takeaways for businesses that rely on delivery drivers, say Esra Hudson and Marah Bragdon at Manatt.