Wage & Hour

  • July 15, 2024

    EMS Workers Want Early Win In OT Gap Dispute

    A class and collective of emergency medical services workers asked a North Carolina federal court for summary judgment in their overtime suit against a county, arguing basic math proves employees were underpaid in violation of an ordinance.

  • July 15, 2024

    JPMorgan Chase Workers Had To Eat At Desks, Suit Says

    Chase Bank encouraged workers to perform off-the-clock work but failed to pay them accordingly, while also giving them so much work that they were forced to take their meals at their desks, a former employee said in a suit in California state court.

  • July 15, 2024

    HVAC Co. To Pay Workers $850K to End Wage Class Deal

    An HVAC company has agreed to pay $850,000 to settle an ex-technician's proposed class action alleging meal break and wage violations, according to a bid for preliminary approval filed in Washington state court.

  • July 15, 2024

    Denver Can't Enforce State Wage And Hour Law, Cos. Say

    A worker-finding platform and a staffing company said the City of Denver and its auditor office don't have the authority to investigate wage and hour violations, telling a Colorado federal court that their overreach could lead to hefty penalties.

  • July 15, 2024

    NLRB Judge Says Bakery Fired Worker Over Tip Complaints

    A bakery in New York City's Harlem neighborhood violated federal labor law by firing a worker who complained about issues workers had with tips and scheduling at the shop, a National Labor Relations Board judge has ruled, rejecting the bakery's argument that the worker quit.

  • July 15, 2024

    Seyfarth Adds 5-Atty Labor Team From Hunton In Calif., Texas

    Seyfarth Shaw LLP announced Monday that it has brought on a five-member team of labor and employment lawyers who previously practiced with Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP.

  • July 15, 2024

    Mich. School Staffing Co., Ex-Worker Settle OT Suit

    A Michigan school staffing firm has agreed to pay employees double their overtime rate to settle a lawsuit alleging the company denied workers overtime wages, according to a filing Monday, resolving a proposed collective and class action lawsuit that an ex-security guard and support worker filed earlier this year.

  • July 15, 2024

    Renewable Energy Co. Owes $239K For OT Violations

    A renewable energy company in Puerto Rico owes nearly $239,000 for denying more than 1,000 solar panel and system installers their full overtime pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday.

  • July 15, 2024

    Amazon Tells Wash. Court It Rightfully Filed Arbitration Bids

    Amazon properly moved to arbitrate in districts where drivers accusing the e-commerce giant of misclassifying them as independent contractors agreed to arbitrate their claims, the company told a Washington federal judge, urging the court to deny the workers' request for an injunction.

  • July 15, 2024

    Customer Support Co., DOL Ink $3M Deal In Wage Suit

    A customer support services company agreed to pay out $3 million to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit in Florida federal court claiming it misclassified thousands of workers as independent contractors.

  • July 15, 2024

    Wis. Senior Care Co., DOL Reach $30K Deal To End Wage Suit

    A senior living center in Wisconsin will pay $30,000 to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it denied workers their full wages, according to court documents.

  • July 15, 2024

    7 Wage-Hour Cases To Watch In 2024

    Several legal fights that will dominate the rest of 2024 are variations on the debate around who has the power to make and change laws and who is considered an employee, with the cases challenging the breadth of the U.S. Department of Labor's rulemaking authority in the spotlight. Here, Law360 looks at seven cases to watch in the year's latter half.

  • July 15, 2024

    Wage Cases To Follow As Justices Rein In Agencies

    A trio of U.S. Supreme Court rulings this term that dulled administrative agencies' power are likely to make an impact on how the U.S. Department of Labor enforces wage and hour law. Here, Law360 reviews six cases where their application is already becoming a point of contention.

  • July 15, 2024

    Veteran Employment Litigator Jumps From Kasowitz To Akin

    A veteran employment litigator has joined Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP in New York after nearly 16 years at Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP.

  • July 12, 2024

    Law360 Names 2024's Top Attorneys Under 40

    Law360 is pleased to announce the Rising Stars of 2024, our list of 158 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments belie their age.

  • July 12, 2024

    Chevron Irrelevant To Tipped Worker Rule, DOL Tells 5th Circ.

    The U.S. Department of Labor told the Fifth Circuit that it need not consider the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision scrapping Chevron deference in a lawsuit restaurant groups filed combating a rule affecting tipped workers, saying it has no impact on the case.

  • July 12, 2024

    9th Circ. Brings Back Boot-Up Pay Claims For 2nd Time

    The Ninth Circuit revived and sent back to lower court a suit seeking pay from a call center for minutes that workers spent booting up their computers before their shifts, ruling it is still disputed whether the preshift work was too brief and administratively difficult to track.

  • July 12, 2024

    Expect NCAA To Dig In Heels On Employee Status After Ruling

    Even after Thursday's Third Circuit ruling clearing a path for college athletes to be considered employees, experts say the NCAA's record of litigating to the hilt on other athletes' rights matters portends a long road ahead before the issue is clarified.

  • July 12, 2024

    Territories Await OT Update As Rulemaking Window Narrows

    A U.S. Department of Labor final rule raising salary thresholds for overtime exemptions is now in effect, but attorneys are waiting on updates for the U.S. territories after the federal government abandoned such proposed changes. Here, Law360 explores the territories overtime issue.

  • July 12, 2024

    Off The Bench: NCAA Loses, Favre Wobbles, NFL Fights Back

    In this week's Off The Bench, the Third Circuit enlivens the debate over whether college athletes can be considered employees, the Fifth Circuit is skeptical of Brett Favre's defamation suit and the NFL disputes claims of racism.

  • July 12, 2024

    Staffing Agency Accused Of Misclassifying Workers

    A staffing agency misclassified customer service agents as independent contractors and failed to pay them for all the hours they worked, according to a proposed class and collective action filed in Colorado federal court.

  • July 12, 2024

    Gas Co. Says Trader Can't Get Bonus From Risky Trades

    A Colorado gas marketing company has urged a state judge to find a former trading director forfeited his right to collect a $3.3 million bonus because it was the result of risky and unauthorized trading, according to a motion asking the court to toss a jury's damages award.

  • July 12, 2024

    Calif. Restaurant Pays $83K For Wage Infractions

    A California restaurant paid nearly $83,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying workers their full wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Friday.

  • July 12, 2024

    American Airlines Shakes Off Calif. Wage Suit

    A California federal judge tossed proposed class action claims that American Airlines interrupted meal breaks, skimped on overtime wages and required off-the-clock work, leaving a chance for their revival while axing permanently a former worker's individual claims because of an individual settlement agreement, according to court records. 

  • July 12, 2024

    ​2nd Circ. Asked If Workers Can Sue For Incorrect Pay Stubs

    A New York federal judge refused to reconsider a decision tossing workers' claims that a packaging supplies manufacturer provided them with inaccurate wage statements for lack of standing, but he agreed to send the standing question to the Second Circuit.

Expert Analysis

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Where 9th Circ. Lowe's Ruling Leaves PAGA Jurisprudence

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    Leah Kennedy and Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks discuss the legal landscape and controlling precedent around the Private Attorneys General Act that led to the Ninth Circuit's Johnson v. Lowe's decision last month on individual PAGA wage claims, and explore the open questions that it leaves.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

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    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Investigation Lessons In 'Minority Report'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper discuss how themes in Steven Spielberg's Science Fiction masterpiece "Minority Report" — including prediction, prevention and the fallibility of systems — can have real-life implications in workplace investigations.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Trial Tips For Fighting Worker PPE Pay Claims

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    Courts have struggled for decades to reach consensus on whether employees must be paid for time spent donning and doffing personal protective equipment, but this convoluted legal history points to practical trial strategies to help employers defeat these Fair Labor Standards Act claims, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.