More Employment Coverage

  • July 05, 2024

    The Sharpest Dissents From The Supreme Court Term

    The U.S. Supreme Court's session ended with a series of blockbuster cases that granted the president broad immunity, changed federal gun policy and kneecapped administrative agencies. And many of the biggest decisions fell along partisan lines.

  • July 05, 2024

    5 Moments That Shaped The Supreme Court's Jan. 6 Decision

    When the high court limited the scope of a federal obstruction statute used to charge hundreds of rioters who stormed the Capitol, the justices did not vote along ideological lines. In a year marked by 6-3 splits, what accounts for the departure? Here are some moments from oral arguments that may have swayed the justices.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court's Term

    In a U.S. Supreme Court term teeming with serious showdowns, the august air at oral arguments filled with laughter after an attorney mentioned her plastic surgeon and a justice seemed to diss his colleagues, to cite just two of the term's mirthful moments. Here, we look at the funniest moments of the term.

  • July 05, 2024

    Ex-Law Firm Exec Accused Of Theft Wants 'Malicious' Claim

    A former executive at McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP has asked a New Jersey state court to let her pursue a malicious prosecution counterclaim against the firm over its theft allegations against her, alleging that she didn't engage in any financial fraud. 

  • July 05, 2024

    NC Practice Says Doctor Is Trying To 'Destroy' It In Fraud Suit

    A physician concealed his overprescribing of drugs and fraudulent billing to induce the sale of his practice to another doctor only to "destroy" the clinic by turning patients against the new owner, according to a lawsuit filed in the North Carolina Business Court

  • July 05, 2024

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    This U.S. Supreme Court term featured high-stakes oral arguments on issues including gerrymandering, abortion and federal agency authority, and a hot bench ever more willing to engage in a lengthy back-and-forth with advocates. Here's a look at the law firms that argued the most cases and how they fared.

  • July 05, 2024

    Cannabis Co. Trulieve Settles Suit Against Ex-CFO

    A federal judge has agreed to toss with prejudice a lawsuit Trulieve, Florida's largest medical marijuana company, filed against one of its former executives accusing him of misusing hundreds of thousands of dollars of company money, after both sides reached some kind of deal.

  • July 03, 2024

    Roche Says Stanford Profs Stole Cancer Detection Tech

    Roche Molecular Systems has accused Stanford University and several faculty members of swiping its proprietary cancer detection technology and secretly founding a new company with it, according to a suit filed in California federal court.

  • July 03, 2024

    Don't Dismiss Suit Over Ex-Employee's 'Raid,' Lender Says

    Mortgage lender Caliber Home Loans Inc. has accused a competitor of taking "another bite at the preemption apple" in seeking dismissal of the latest version of a suit over alleged poaching, telling a Dallas federal judge that the suit revision raises "additional, distinct facts" that support allowing its claims to go forward.

  • July 03, 2024

    Ex-Conn. Goodwill Exec Says Whistleblowing Ended His Job

    The former top executive at Goodwill of Western and Northern Connecticut Inc. has launched a state court lawsuit alleging he was fired for complaining about the nonprofit's governance, questioning statements on its IRS filings and expressing doubts about a proposed merger. 

  • July 03, 2024

    NYC Pensions Defeat Challenge To Fossil Fuel Divestments

    A trio of New York City pension plans on Wednesday beat a lawsuit claiming they'd damaged public employees' retirement funds by removing $3.9 billion from investments in fossil fuels, with a New York state judge ruling the workers hadn't shown they'd been harmed by the divestments.

  • July 03, 2024

    Bowling Co. Seeks $3.6M In Atty Fees From Former Exec

    One of the world's largest bowling operations asked a Virginia federal judge to award $3.6 million in legal fees stemming from a lawsuit that accuses the company's former chief information officer of repeatedly hacking into its CEO's email.

  • July 03, 2024

    Texas Court Puts FTC's Noncompete Ban On Hold

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday blocked the Federal Trade Commission from enforcing its rule banning noncompete agreements against tax preparation company Ryan LLC and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and suggested the regulation should be shot down.

  • July 03, 2024

    College Tennis Player Wants NCAA Prize Rule Sidelined

    The nationally ranked collegiate tennis player leading a proposed antitrust class action to overturn the NCAA's ban on prize money from outside competition is now asking a North Carolina federal judge for a preliminary injunction to stop enforcement of the "archaic" rule.

  • July 03, 2024

    Judge OKs Bid To End FindLaw Trade Secrets Lawsuit

    A New York federal judge has approved a deal to resolve a trade secrets dispute between West Publishing Corp. and RizeUp Media Inc. stemming from the departure of several key employees from West.

  • July 03, 2024

    Atty's COVID Relief Fraud Case Ends After Diversion Program

    A Georgia federal judge has tossed charges against an attorney over a fraudulent scheme involving federal pandemic-relief business loans, granting on Wednesday the government's motion to dismiss after the attorney completed a pretrial diversion program.

  • July 03, 2024

    Biden's New Picks Include NC Solicitor General For 4th Circ.

    President Joe Biden announced four new judicial nominees on Wednesday, including one for the Fourth Circuit.

  • July 02, 2024

    Labor Dept. Unveils Proposed Extreme Heat Protections

    The U.S. Department of Labor on Tuesday announced proposed new regulations aimed at protecting workers in extreme heat by requiring employers to develop plans for mitigating heat-related hazards in the workplace and responding quickly to emergencies.

  • July 02, 2024

    Gig Co. Inks $7M FTC Deal Over Misleading Pay Promises

    Arise Virtual Solutions Inc., a platform that connects gig workers with companies, on Tuesday agreed to pay $7 million to resolve Federal Trade Commission allegations that it misled workers about the money they could earn working from home as customer service agents for major companies.

  • July 02, 2024

    Ex-Jets Worker Says Team, NFL Stole His Logo Design

    A former New York Jets film and video director claims the team used his logo design off and on for years without his permission or compensating him for its use, according to a suit filed in federal court.

  • July 02, 2024

    IT Workers Say Chevron's End Dooms Spouse Work Permits

    Ex-information technology workers told the D.C. Circuit that the U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning decades-old precedent instructing judges about when they can defer to federal agencies' interpretations of law buoys their challenge to an Obama-era program allowing work permits for some spouses of highly skilled foreign workers.

  • July 02, 2024

    4th Circ. Nixes Black Lung Benefits For American Energy Miner

    The Fourth Circuit on Monday upended an award of black lung benefits to the widow of a miner who worked for American Energy LLC, saying it was the widow's responsibility to prove that coal dust exposure, more than smoking, is what caused his respiratory disease.

  • July 02, 2024

    NCAA Escapes USF Baseball Coach Abuse Suit For Now

    An Indiana federal judge on Tuesday dismissed, at least for the time being, a lawsuit filed by University of San Francisco baseball players accusing the NCAA of causing harm by remaining silent about the "rampant" sexual abuse committed by two USF coaches, ruling that there was no contractual relationship between the parties.

  • July 02, 2024

    Contractor Says Chevron Reversal 'Upends' Navy Deal Suit

    A military contractor seeking to undo the U.S. Navy's contract with a competitor for support services at European bases has told the Federal Circuit that the U.S. Supreme Court's recent overturning of the so-called Chevron doctrine "upends" the underlying decision in its suit.

  • July 02, 2024

    McKinsey Wants To Arbitrate Ex-Partner's Defamation Suit

    McKinsey & Co. has urged a New York state judge to send to arbitration or dismiss a former partner's defamation lawsuit alleging the consulting giant tried to make him a scapegoat for purported evidence destruction amid a U.S. Department of Justice probe into McKinsey's work with opioid makers.

Expert Analysis

  • NCAA Settlement May End The NIL Model As We Know It

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    The recent House v. NCAA settlement in California federal court, in which the NCAA agreed to allow schools to directly pay March Madness television revenue to their athletes, may send outside name, image and likeness collectives in-house, says Mike Ingersoll at Womble Bond.

  • Boeing Saga Underscores Need For Ethical Corporate Culture

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    In the wake of recent allegations about Boeing’s safety culture, and amid the U.S. Department of Justice’s new whistleblower incentives, business leaders should reinvigorate their emphasis on compliance by making clear that long-term profitability requires ethical business practices, says Maxwell Carr-Howard at Dentons.

  • Why Jurors Balk At 'I Don't Recall' — And How To Respond

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    Jurors often react negatively to a witness who responds “I don’t remember” because they tend to hold erroneous beliefs about the nature of human memory, but attorneys can adopt a few strategies to mitigate the impact of these biases, say Steve Wood and Ava Hernández at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • Exploring Alternatives To Noncompetes Ahead Of FTC Ban

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    Ahead of the Sept. 4 effective date for the Federal Trade Commission's noncompete ban, employers should seek new ways to protect their proprietary and other sensitive information, including by revising existing confidentiality and nondisclosure agreements, says Harvey Linder at Culhane.

  • 10 Tips To Build Trust With Your Witness During Trial Prep

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    Preparing a witness for deposition or trial requires more than just legal skills — lawyers must also work to cultivate trust with the witness, using strategies ranging from wearing a hat when conducting mock cross-examination to offering them a ride to court before they testify, say Faye Paul Teller and Sara McDermott at Munger Tolles.

  • 5th Circ. Venue-Transfer Cases Highlight Mandamus Limits

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    Three ongoing cases filed within the Fifth Circuit highlight an odd procedural wrinkle that may let district courts defy an appellate writ: orders granting transfer to out-of-circuit districts, but parties opposing intercircuit transfer can work around this hurdle to effective appellate review, says Charles Fowler at McKool Smith.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 8 Steps Companies Should Take After An Internal Investigation

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    Given the U.S. Department of Justice’s increasing focus on corporate compliance and remediation of misconduct, companies must follow through in several key ways after an internal investigation to ensure history does not repeat itself, say Jonathan Aronie and Joseph Jay at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • Attys Beware 2 Commonly Overlooked NIL Contract Issues

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    As name, image and likeness deals dominate high school and collegiate sports, preserving a client's NCAA eligibility should be a top priority, so lawyers should understand the potentially damaging contract provisions they may encounter when reviewing an agreement, says Paula Nagarajan at Arnall Golden.

  • After Years Of Popularity, PAGA's Fate Is Up In The Air

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    The last two years held important victories for plaintiff-side employment attorneys in California Private Attorneys General Act litigation at the trial and appellate court levels, but this hotbed of activity will quickly lose steam if voters approve a ballot measure in November to enact the California Fair Pay and Employer Accountability Act, says Paul Sherman at Kabat Chapman.

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