Discrimination

  • July 02, 2024

    DLA Piper Tells Judge Fired Associate Got Proper Discovery

    Counsel for DLA Piper LLP told a Manhattan federal judge on Tuesday the firm has provided responsive information to a former associate who claims she was unlawfully fired while pregnant, adding it is confident her termination was lawful.

  • July 02, 2024

    Wendy's Franchisee Settles EEOC Suit Over Workforce Data

    A company that operates Wendy's restaurants reached a deal with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to end a suit claiming it shirked its legal responsibility to timely submit its workforce demographic data, a filing in Ohio federal court said.

  • July 01, 2024

    High Court's 1-2 Punch Sets Up Long-Standing Regs For KO

    By ending its term with a stinging combination against federal agencies, the U.S. Supreme Court's conservative bloc left behind a bruised bureaucracy and a regulatory system that's now vulnerable to a barrage of incoming attacks.

  • July 01, 2024

    UC Riverside Profs Win Combined $6.1M In Retaliation Trial

    Two former University of California, Riverside professors were awarded a total of $6.1 million in damages by a jury that found they were retaliated against in violation of the California Whistleblower Protection Act after making official complaints about alleged misdeeds their supervisor was engaging in, including misuse of government funds. 

  • July 01, 2024

    Chevron's End May Tilt Challenges To Pregnant Worker Rule

    The recent elimination of a long-standing doctrine that directed judges to defer to federal agencies' interpretations of ambiguous statutory language gives potentially potent ammunition to opponents of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's regulations implementing the Pregnant Worker Fairness Act, attorneys say.

  • July 01, 2024

    FCC Urged To Delay Broadcast Reporting Rule During Lawsuit

    Religious broadcasters and advocacy groups are urging the Federal Communications Commission to halt collection of workforce race and gender demographics at television and radio broadcasters while a challenge to a reinstated rule proceeds in the Fifth Circuit.

  • July 01, 2024

    Nev. Supreme Court Won't Give Gruden 2nd Try Against NFL

    The Nevada Supreme Court will not rehear a decision to send to arbitration former Las Vegas Raiders head coach Jon Gruden's defamation lawsuit against the NFL, a three-member court panel ruled Monday.

  • July 01, 2024

    Workers Accuse Kanye West Of 'Extreme' Racism On The Job

    Eight young app developers have sued "Heartless" rapper Ye, formerly known as Kanye West, his company and its former chief of staff, conservative firebrand Milo Yiannopoulos, in California federal court, alleging they fostered a hostile and abusive working environment, subjecting them to "extreme racism," bullying and harassment without pay.

  • July 01, 2024

    Ill., Northshore Say Anti-Vax Case Not About Religious Liberty

    A nurse working for a Northshore Health unit in Illinois should be permanently blocked from pursuing employment deprivation claims over her initial denial of a COVD-19 religious vaccine exemption, the health facility said, arguing she is using a state conscience law as a "sword" against COVID-19 protections. 

  • July 01, 2024

    Ex-LSU Football Director Seeks Full 5th Circ. Bias Suit Review

    A former Louisiana State University football director asked the Fifth Circuit on Monday for a full-court review of its ruling that her bias suit does not plausibly show that school officials violated public records law by not turning over sexual harassment investigation records.

  • July 01, 2024

    ACLU, NLRB Prosecutors Clash Over Outspoken Atty's Firing

    National Labor Relations Board prosecutors and the American Civil Liberties Union filed dueling briefs in a board challenge to an ex-policy attorney's firing, with prosecutors claiming she was fired for speaking out about bad bosses and the group claiming she relentlessly smeared Black supervisors.

  • July 01, 2024

    8th Circ. Revives ADA Suit By Diabetic Hardee's Manager

    The Eighth Circuit breathed new life Monday into a former manager's lawsuit alleging a Hardee's franchisee fired her because she has diabetes, saying a jury could sort out whether she was unlawfully fired after a diabetic episode that she claimed precluded her from calling in sick.

  • July 01, 2024

    Opera Singer Says Anti-Gay Bias Behind U. Of Michigan Firing

    An opera singer said he was improperly canned from his tenured professorship by the University of Michigan in 2020 after allegations surfaced that he and his husband raped a musician a decade earlier, arguing that he faced harsher punishments and biased proceedings because he is gay.

  • July 01, 2024

    AbbVie Hit With Age, Gender Bias Suit By Former Salesman

    AbbVie Inc. fired a regional sales director as a pretext to avoid paying him for stock options and because of retaliatory complaints by two women who had received poor performance reviews, according to a suit filed in Massachusetts state court.

  • July 01, 2024

    Jury Sides With Amazon In Suit Over Post-Surgery Leave

    Amazon didn't have to give a former employee additional time off after gum disease surgery because she wasn't entitled to medical leave and didn't have a disability under federal law, a Florida federal jury found as it sided with the company.

  • July 01, 2024

    Call Center Strikes Deal To Exit EEOC Disability Bias Probe

    A Columbus, Ohio, call center will pay $23,000 to resolve an investigation that the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission launched into allegations that the company refused to accommodate an employee with a disability and then placed her on unpaid leave.

  • July 01, 2024

    Supreme Court Widens Window To Challenge Federal Regs

    Legal challenges to federal regulations can be brought outside the normal statute of limitations if someone isn't adversely affected until after the six-year window of time to file suit, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday.

  • June 28, 2024

    Chevron's End Is Just The Start For Energized Agency Foes

    By knocking down a powerful precedent that has towered over administrative law for 40 years, the U.S. Supreme Court's right wing Friday gave a crowning achievement to anti-agency attorneys. But for those attorneys, the achievement is merely a means to an end, and experts expect a litigation blitzkrieg to materialize quickly in the aftermath.

  • June 28, 2024

    In Chevron Case, Justices Trade One Unknown For Another

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overrule a decades-old judicial deference doctrine may cause the "eternal fog of uncertainty" surrounding federal agency actions to dissipate and level the playing field in challenges of government policies, but lawyers warn it raises new questions over what rules courts must follow and how judges will implement them.

  • June 28, 2024

    PAGA Reforms Clear Calif. Assembly, Head To Newsom's Desk

    California legislators in both the Senate and Assembly overwhelmingly backed big changes to California's Private Attorneys General Act, including an adjustment to how penalties are assessed to employers and awarded to employees, sending the package to Gov. Gavin Newsom's desk.

  • June 28, 2024

    4th Circ. Backs Bank's Win In Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday declined to reinstate a lawsuit that a Black former manager brought against a bank accusing it of firing her because she complained about racial bias, saying she failed to rebut the company's argument that she was let go because of her poor performance.

  • June 28, 2024

    Fired BlueCross Worker Gets $680K Jury Win In Vax Bias Suit

    A Tennessee federal jury awarded a former BlueCross BlueShield employee more than $680,000 after it found the insurance company failed to accommodate her when she was fired for refusing its COVID-19 vaccination mandate because of her religious convictions.

  • June 28, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Mining Co.'s Defeat Of Driver's FMLA Suit

    The Ninth Circuit upheld a mining company's jury win over a truck driver's lawsuit claiming he was fired because he took time off after a workplace injury, saying Friday that employers don't have to rely on medical evidence to challenge a doctor's diagnosis under federal medical leave law.

  • June 28, 2024

    Nonprofit To Pay $1M To End EEOC Disability Bias Suit

    A nonprofit that provides career opportunities for individuals with disabilities agreed Friday to pay $1 million to resolve a lawsuit from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing it of failing to provide sign language interpreters and firing employees who needed to take medical leave.

  • June 28, 2024

    8th Circ. Reopens Healthcare Worker's Vaccine Bias Case

    The Eighth Circuit revived a physical therapist's lawsuit Friday alleging a healthcare nonprofit treated her differently because she had a religious exemption from its COVID-19 vaccine mandate, telling the lower court to assess her case through the lens of a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision.

Expert Analysis

  • AI Isn't The Wild West, So Prepare Now For Bias Risks

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    In addition to President Joe Biden's recent historic executive order on safe, secure and trustworthy artificial intelligence, there are existing federal and state laws prohibiting fraud, defamation and even discrimination, so companies considering using or developing AI should take steps to minimize legal and business risks, says civil rights attorney Farhana Khera.

  • AI's Baked-In Bias: What To Watch Out For

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    The federal AI executive order is a direct acknowledgment of the perils of inherent bias in artificial intelligence systems, and highlights the need for legal professionals to thoroughly vet AI systems, including data and sources, algorithms and AI training methods, and more, say Jonathan Hummel and Jonathan Talcott at Ballard Spahr.

  • 'Miss Manners' Scenarios Holds Job Accommodation Lessons

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    Robin Shea at Constangy looks at the potentially negative legal consequences for employers who follow some advice recently given in the Washington Post's "Miss Manners" column, and offers solutions of her own.

  • How Biden's AI Order Stacks Up Against Calif. And G7 Activity

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    Evaluating the federal AI executive order alongside the California AI executive order and the G7's Hiroshima AI Code of Conduct can offer a more robust picture of key risks and concerns companies should proactively work to mitigate as they build or integrate artificial intelligence tools into their products and services, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Handling Religious Objections To Abortion-Related Job Duties

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    While health care and pharmacy employee religious exemption requests concerning abortion-related procedures or drugs are not new, recent cases demonstrate why employer accommodation considerations should factor in the Title VII standard set forth by the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2023 Groff v. DeJoy ruling, as well as applicable federal, state and local laws, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • Transgender Worker Rights: A Guide For California Employers

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    California employers should know their obligations under overlapping state and federal law to protect the rights of their transgender, nonbinary and gender-nonconforming workers, and implement best practices to avoid discriminating in how they hire and promote, offer medical benefits to, and prevent harassment of these employees, says Michael Guasco at Littler.

  • The Self-Funded Plan's Guide To Gender-Affirming Coverage

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    Self-funded group health plans face complicated legal risks when determining whether to cover gender-affirming health benefits for their transgender participants, so plan sponsors should carefully weigh how federal nondiscrimination laws and state penalties for providing care for trans minors could affect their decision to offer coverage, say Tim Kennedy and Anne Tyler Hall at Hall Benefits Law.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Eliminating Recruiting, Hiring Barriers

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    While the recruiting and hiring segment of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan spotlights the potential discriminatory effects of artificial intelligence, employers should note that it also touches on traditional bias issues such as unlawfully targeted job advertisements and application inaccessibility, say Rachel See and Annette Tyman at Seyfarth.

  • A Look Into The Developing Regulation Of Employer AI

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    Although employers' use of artificial intelligence is still limited, legislators and companies have been ramping up their efforts to regulate its use in the workplace, with employers actively contributing to the ongoing debate, say Gerald Hathaway and Marc-Joseph Gansah at Faegre Drinker.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Advancing Equal Pay

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan expresses a renewed commitment to advancing equal pay at a time when employees have unprecedented access to compensation information, highlighting for employers the importance of open communication and ongoing pay equity analyses, say Paul Evans at Baker McKenzie and Christine Hendrickson at Syndio.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Clarifies Title VII Claim Standards

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    The Second Circuit's recent opinion in Banks v. General Motors, although it does not break new ground legally, comes at a crucial time when courts are reevaluating standards that apply to Title VII claims of discrimination and provides many useful lessons for practitioners, says Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Preventing Systemic Harassment

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    With the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's recently finalized strategic enforcement plan identifying a renewed commitment to preventing and remedying systemic harassment, employers must ensure that workplace policies address the many complex elements of this pervasive issue — including virtual harassment and workers' intersecting identities, say Ally Coll and Shea Holman at the Purple Method.

  • Cos. Must Reassess Retaliation Risk As 2nd. Circ. Lowers Bar

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    After a recent Second Circuit decision broadened the federal standard for workplace retaliation, employers should reinforce their nondiscrimination and complaint-handling policies to help management anticipate and monitor worker grievances that could give rise to such claims, says Thomas Eron at Bond Schoeneck.