Discrimination

  • July 17, 2024

    Gannett Axed Worker Over Visual Impairment, Suit Says

    A former content strategy analyst at Gannett was the only member of his department included in a 2022 round of layoffs because he's visually impaired and works from home — a violation of federal disability law, according to a complaint filed Wednesday in Florida federal court.

  • July 17, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Egypt Law Unsuited For Wash. Worker Case

    The Ninth Circuit said on Tuesday that Washington employment law applies to a worker's wrongful termination claims against Fivos Inc., stymieing the worker's attempt to apply Egyptian labor law because she had worked from the country.

  • July 17, 2024

    Ministerial Exception Ends Buddhist's ADA Suit At 9th Circ.

    The Ninth Circuit backed the dismissal Wednesday of a former Buddhist apprentice's suit claiming his temple failed to accommodate his PTSD, knocking down arguments that the menial work he completed in his role prevented his claims from being nullified by a ministerial exception to anti-bias law.

  • July 17, 2024

    UMich Ducks Black Law Prof's Bias, Retaliation Suit

    A Michigan federal judge released the University of Michigan on Wednesday from a Black law professor's lawsuit accusing the school of harshly disciplining her after she complained about race discrimination, saying she failed to rebut the university's argument that she was punished because she threatened staff members.

  • July 17, 2024

    6th Circ. Skeptical About Nixing Diver's Harassment Verdict

    The Sixth Circuit appeared inclined Wednesday to uphold a $58,000 verdict awarded to a commercial diver who accused an environmental cleanup company of subjecting her to harassment and belittlement, with several judges expressing doubt about superseding the jury's conclusion. 

  • July 17, 2024

    After #MeToo, Report Suggests Judiciary Workplace Reforms

    A report released on Wednesday makes 34 suggested reforms for the federal judiciary to better protect its approximately 30,000 employees, including clerks, building off changes made following the #MeToo movement.

  • July 17, 2024

    Ex-SAP Sales Rep Says It Thwarted His Commission Over Age

    SAP America Inc. canned a software sales representative in his 60s just as he was about to land a million-dollar deal in order to hand off the sale to a younger woman on his team, according to an age discrimination suit filed against the company in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • July 17, 2024

    ADA Can't Shield Worker From Failed Drug Test, Co. Says

    A chemical transportation company urged a South Carolina federal court to toss a former lift operator's lawsuit alleging he was fired for taking legal CBD because of cysts on his brain and spinal cord, arguing disability law doesn't protect workers from positive drug tests for THC.

  • July 17, 2024

    IHOP Owner Strikes Deal To Exit EEOC Religious Bias Suit

    An IHOP restaurant agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve a suit from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing the business of firing a Christian cook because he asked to take Sundays off to attend church, a filing in North Carolina federal court said.

  • July 16, 2024

    Marathon Beats Ex-Worker's Gender Discrimination Case

    A Colorado federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by a former Marathon Petroleum human resources supervisor who claimed she was forced out for inappropriate behavior while male coworkers got a free pass, finding that the supervisor's conduct was worse than the male colleague who she claimed received preferential treatment.

  • July 16, 2024

    Retailer Stood By While Clerk Harassed Women, EEOC Says

    Superstore chain Fred Meyer Stores Inc. failed to stop a male sales clerk from repeatedly harassing, leering at and stalking women he worked with despite numerous complaints, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told a federal court in Washington state Tuesday.

  • July 16, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs Manufacturer Win In Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Seventh Circuit declined Tuesday to reinstate a lawsuit from a Black worker accusing a manufacturing company of firing him in retaliation for complaining about race discrimination with his union, saying there's no error in the lower court's decision despite it relying on his former plant manager's flubbed testimony.

  • July 16, 2024

    9th Circ. Citizen Bias Stance May Spur Hiring Policy Reviews

    The Ninth Circuit recently held that a Reconstruction-era civil rights statute allows American workers to accuse employers in federal court of favoring noncitizens, a ruling that creates a rift with the Fifth Circuit and should prompt companies to tighten their foreign worker recruitment practices. Here, experts discuss three things to know about the Ninth Circuit's decision.

  • July 16, 2024

    Ex-NBA Ref Must Show Psychologist Comms In COVID-19 Suit

    A former NBA referee must turn over records between his psychologist and his counsel to demonstrate whether the league's COVID-19 vaccination policies had the debilitating effect on his psyche that he claims in a lawsuit, a New York federal judge has ruled.

  • July 16, 2024

    Dollar General Strikes $295K Deal To End EEOC Age Bias Suit

    Dollar General has agreed to hand over $295,000 to close a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission age bias suit alleging a regional manager told older district managers he wanted to replace them with younger employees, according to an Oklahoma federal court filing Tuesday.

  • July 16, 2024

    Ex-County Exec Wants Firm Kicked Off NJ Discrimination Suit

    A former New Jersey county health director who claims his termination was retaliatory wants the firm representing the county disqualified, arguing Testa Heck Testa & White PA is conflicted due to interactions he had with two of the firm's attorneys before and during his termination meeting.

  • July 16, 2024

    EEOC Backs Ex-Uber Driver's Bid To Revive Race Bias Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission urged the Ninth Circuit to reconsider a former Uber driver's lawsuit claiming the ride-hailing giant's rating system is racially biased, arguing that a panel's June ruling flew in the face of federal civil rights law and U.S. Supreme Court precedent.

  • July 16, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Adds Employment Ace In Dallas From Ogletree

    Fisher Phillips announced Tuesday that it has upped the headcount at its new Dallas location with a partner who came aboard from Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • July 16, 2024

    The 2024 Diversity Snapshot: What You Need To Know

    Law firms' ongoing initiatives to address diversity challenges have driven another year of progress, with the representation of minority attorneys continuing to improve across the board, albeit at a slower pace than in previous years. Here's our data dive into minority representation at law firms in 2023.

  • July 16, 2024

    These Firms Have The Most Diverse Equity Partnerships

    Law360’s law firm survey shows that firms' efforts to diversify their equity partner ranks are lagging. But some have embraced a broader talent pool at the equity partner level. Here are the ones that stood out.

  • July 16, 2024

    Health System Strikes Deal To End EEOC Race Bias Suit

    A Michigan healthcare system has agreed to pay a Black home health aid $30,000 to resolve a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit alleging she was immediately fired in contradiction with system policy after a white worker accused her of starting a verbal conflict.

  • July 16, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Printing Co.'s Win In Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit refused to reinstate a Black sales worker's lawsuit alleging that a printing company caused his performance to plummet by reassigning him to locations with lower revenues, saying he failed to show the firm was motivated by racial animus when it reorganized its sales department.

  • July 15, 2024

    Male Writer Pans CBS' Free Speech Defense In Bias Suit

    A straight white male worker who claims CBS discriminated against him by repeatedly choosing to hire more diverse candidates for writer roles urged a California federal judge to reject CBS Studios Inc.'s bid to ax the case Monday, arguing that the First Amendment "doesn't per se" shield entertainment corporations like CBS from liability.

  • July 15, 2024

    Calif. Justices Nix 3 Charter Arb. Terms, Remand Severability

    The California Supreme Court held Monday that three of four challenged provisions in Charter Communications Inc.'s employee arbitration agreement are "substantively unconscionable" but remanded a worker's discrimination case back to the trial court to determine if those provisions can be severed and the agreement can still be enforced.

  • July 15, 2024

    School Counselor's FMLA Suit Should Be Tossed, Judge Says

    A Georgia school district should be allowed to escape a former counselor's lawsuit alleging she was terminated for requesting time off to care for her sick husband, a federal judge said Monday, finding she couldn't overcome the district's explanation that she'd failed to correct performance issues despite multiple opportunities.

Expert Analysis

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • Shaping Speech Policies After NLRB's BLM Protest Ruling

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    After the National Labor Relations Board decided last month that a Home Depot employee was protected by federal labor law when they wore a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, employers should consider four questions in order to mitigate legal risks associated with workplace political speech policies, say Louis Cannon and Cassandra Horton at Baker Donelson.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • 11th Circ. FMLA Ruling Deepens Divide Over Causation

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent ruling in Lapham v. Walgreen distinguishes the circuit as the loudest advocate for the but-for causation standard for assessing Family and Medical Leave Act retaliation claims, though employers in other jurisdictions may encounter less favorable standards and the U.S. Supreme Court will likely have to address the circuit split eventually, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Handling Neurodivergence As The Basis Of Disability Claims

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    Three recent discrimination claims in Rhode Island and New Jersey show how allegations of adverse treatment of neurodivergent individuals will continue to be tested in court, so employers should create an environment that welcomes the disclosure of such conditions, says Ting Cheung at Sanford Heisler.

  • Employers Should Take Surgeon's Sex Bias Suit As A Warning

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    A Philadelphia federal jury's recent verdict in a sex bias suit over Thomas Jefferson University's inaction on a male plaintiff's sexual harassment complaint is a reminder to employers of all stripes about the importance of consistently applied protocols for handling complaints, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • Generative AI Adds Risk To Employee 'Self-Help' Discovery

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    Plaintiffs have long engaged in their own evidence gathering for claims against current or former employers, but as more companies implement generative AI tools, both the potential scope and the potential risks of such "self-help" discovery are rising quickly, says Nick Peterson at Wiley.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.

  • Employer Pointers As Wage And Hour AI Risks Emerge

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    Following the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence, employers using or considering artificial intelligence tools should carefully assess whether such use could increase their exposure to liability under federal and state wage and hour laws, and be wary of algorithmic discrimination, bias and inaccurate or incomplete reporting, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Race Bias Defense Considerations After 11th Circ. Ruling

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    In Tynes v. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed that the McDonnell Douglas test for employment discrimination cases is merely an evidentiary framework, so employers relying on it as a substantive standard of liability may need to rethink their litigation strategy, says Helen Jay at Phelps Dunbar.

  • 6 Ways To Minimize Risk, Remain Respectful During Layoffs

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    With a recent Resume Builder survey finding that 38% of companies expect to lay off employees this year, now is a good time for employers to review several strategies that can help mitigate legal risks and maintain compassion in the reduction-in-force process, says Sahara Pynes at Fox Rothschild.

  • NYC Workplace AI Regulation Has Been Largely Insignificant

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    Though a Cornell University study suggests that a New York City law intended to regulate artificial intelligence in the workplace has had an underwhelming impact, the law may still help shape the city's future AI regulation efforts, say Reid Skibell and Nathan Ades at Glenn Agre.