Discrimination

  • July 15, 2024

    4 Takeaways As Hiring Bias Suit Over Workday AI Proceeds

    A closely watched discrimination lawsuit over software provider Workday's artificial intelligence-powered hiring tools is headed into discovery after a California federal court ruled the company may be subject to federal antidiscrimination laws if its products make decisions on candidates. Here are four things to know about the latest development in the cutting-edge case.

  • July 15, 2024

    New York AG Lobs New Challenge To Rec Sports Trans Ban

    New York Attorney General Letitia James and a local roller derby league each sued to strike down a newly passed law banning transgender women and girls from participating in recreational sports at facilities run by Nassau County on Monday, reviving a bitter legal fight.

  • July 15, 2024

    8th Circ. Revives Cop's Biased Transfer Suit After Muldrow

    The Eighth Circuit reinstated a St. Louis police officer's suit alleging he was reassigned to a different unit for being straight, reversing its prior decision affirming the dismissal of his suit following a U.S. Supreme Court order loosening requirements the circuit placed on Title VII discrimination claims.

  • July 15, 2024

    Furniture Chain, EEOC Strike Deal To End Vaccine Bias Suit

    Arkansas-based Hank's Furniture Inc. will pay $110,000 to end a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission lawsuit claiming it unlawfully fired a manager who refused the COVID-19 vaccine because of her Christian beliefs, the agency and the retailer told a Florida federal court Monday.

  • July 15, 2024

    Seyfarth Adds 5-Atty Labor Team From Hunton In Calif., Texas

    Seyfarth Shaw LLP announced Monday that it has brought on a five-member team of labor and employment lawyers who previously practiced with Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP.

  • July 15, 2024

    NJ Legal Software Biz Hit With Disability Bias Suit

    Leap Legal Software Inc. was hit with a discrimination lawsuit in New Jersey state court Friday from a former employee alleging she was fired due to her undiagnosed and untreated Lyme disease.

  • July 15, 2024

    Machinery Co. Defends 'Right' To Ax Trans Care In Health Plan

    A turbomachinery company asked to intervene on a transgender worker's New Hampshire federal court claim that its health plan administrators violated Affordable Care Act anti-bias provisions by enforcing a gender dysphoria treatment ban in the company's health plan, arguing that the issue is intertwined with its mission.

  • July 15, 2024

    'Busy' Solo Atty Chided For Blown Deadline In Pa. Bias Case

    A Pennsylvania federal judge gave an earful to an attorney representing a Drexel University administrator suing the school for disability discrimination after the case was dismissed without prejudice over the attorney's missed deadlines.

  • July 15, 2024

    Amazon Shouldn't Have To Face Retaliation Suit, Judge Says

    Amazon Web Services shouldn't have to face a suit from a former recruiter who claims she was fired for complaining that a supervisor made disparaging comments about older people and Hispanic workers, a Texas federal judge said, finding poor performance cost her the job, not retribution.

  • July 15, 2024

    Veteran Employment Litigator Jumps From Kasowitz To Akin

    A veteran employment litigator has joined Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP in New York after nearly 16 years at Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP.

  • July 15, 2024

    EEOC Commissioner Sonderling To Depart Agency

    EEOC Commissioner Keith Sonderling announced Monday he will leave the agency in August when his term ends, wrapping up a seven-year tenure with the federal government to return to the private sector.

  • July 15, 2024

    Workday AI Hiring Bias Suit Cleared To Move Ahead

    A job candidate's discrimination case over Workday's artificial intelligence-powered hiring tools got the go-ahead to move into the fact-finding stage, as a California federal judge said it's plausible that employment bias laws could stretch to reach the software vendor.

  • July 12, 2024

    Law360 Names 2024's Top Attorneys Under 40

    Law360 is pleased to announce the Rising Stars of 2024, our list of 158 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments belie their age.

  • July 12, 2024

    Cuomo Beats Retaliation Claims In NY Trooper's Suit

    Former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo defeated retaliation claims in a state trooper's lawsuit alleging she was sexually harassed while serving in Cuomo's security detail, after a federal judge said that no employment relationship existed because Cuomo resigned months before his purported threat to seek prosecution of his alleged victims.

  • July 12, 2024

    Military's IVF Policy Defense Fails Post-Chevron, Group Says

    A nonprofit that's challenging the U.S. military's in vitro fertilization coverage policy for service members told a New York federal judge that federal agencies cannot claim they're entitled to Chevron deference in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision overturning the decades-old precedent.

  • July 12, 2024

    Texas Courts Block Protections For Transgender Students

    Two Texas federal judges have blocked the U.S. Department of Education from enforcing protections for transgender students in Lone Star State schools while lawsuits against the rules are litigated, with one judge saying the measures provide "extra privileges to the transgender student based on subjective feelings of discomfort."

  • July 12, 2024

    4 Law Firm Bias Cases To Watch In 2024's 2nd Half

    Jones Day and Foley & Lardner LLP are among the powerhouse law firms attempting to fend off accusations that they subjected lawyers to discrimination. Here, Law360 looks at four ongoing employment suits against law firms that are worth watching in the back half of 2024.

  • July 12, 2024

    Amazon Must Produce Docs In EEOC Pregnancy Bias Probe

    A New York federal judge ordered Amazon to cough up documents the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission requested as part of its investigation into allegations that the e-commerce giant systematically discriminates against pregnant workers, saying the information the agency seeks, despite its breadth, is relevant.

  • July 12, 2024

    Union Must Face Black Truck Driver's Race Bias Suit

    An Ohio federal judge refused to throw out a Black truck driver's suit against the International United Auto Workers, saying he put forward enough information to support his allegation that the union did a poor job of representing him when his employer fired him for his social media posts.

  • July 12, 2024

    Boston To Pay $1M To End Health Dept. Harassment Case

    A high-profile sexual harassment case against the city of Boston and its former health director settled for $1 million earlier this month, according to a copy of the agreement released Friday.

  • July 12, 2024

    8th Circ. Won't Grant Fired Army Staffer New Retaliation Trial

    The Eighth Circuit declined Friday to overrule a lower court's order denying a former U.S. Army supply specialist a new trial in her retaliation suit alleging she was fired for reporting that she was sexually harassed, finding that she didn't follow court rules when filing her appeal.

  • July 12, 2024

    Ex-Quantix Worker Sues Abbott Labs Over Drug Test Firing

    A former employee of Quantix SCS LLC is suing the company, Abbott Laboratories Inc. and two other drug testing companies, saying he was wrongly fired after testing positive for THC and the companies did not consider that it could have resulted from his use of legal CBD products.

  • July 12, 2024

    'Bias Interrupters' Help Employer DEI Goals, New Study Finds

    Traditional workplace bias training is not as effective as an evidence-based model that works to prevent discrimination through changes to practices such as hiring, performance evaluations and promotions, according to a new study.

  • July 12, 2024

    7 Gender-Affirming Care Cases To Watch In 2024's 2nd Half

    The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to review a constitutional challenge by the federal government to Tennessee's ban on gender-affirming care for minors, while other appeals courts are weighing the constitutionality of states' and employers' restrictions on gender dysphoria treatment. Here are seven cases involving gender-affirming care access that attorneys will be tracking in the second half of the year.

  • July 12, 2024

    Black Educator Can't Revive Race Retaliation Suit At 11th Circ.

    The Eleventh Circuit rejected a Black educator's bid to revive her retaliation suit claiming her school board declined to renew her contract because she complained that an assistant principal racially harassed her, ruling that she failed to overcome concerns about her habitual tardiness.

Expert Analysis

  • Anti-DEI Complaints Filed With EEOC Carry No Legal Weight

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    Recently filed complaints against several companies' diversity, equity and inclusion programs alleging unlawful discrimination against white people do not require a response from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and should not stop employers from rooting out ongoing discriminatory practices, says former EEOC general counsel David Lopez.

  • How DEI Programs Are Being Challenged In Court And Beyond

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's affirmative action decision last year declaring the consideration of race in university admissions unconstitutional, employers should keep abreast of recent litigation challenging diversity, equity and inclusion training programs, as well as legislation both supporting and opposing DEI initiatives in the workplace, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What Minority Biz Law Ruling Could Mean For Private DEI

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    A Texas federal court’s recent decision to strike down key provisions of the Minority Business Development Act illustrates the wide-reaching effects of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard decision across legal contexts, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Texas Hair Bias Ruling Does Not Give Employers A Pass

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    A Texas state court’s recent decision, holding that a school could discipline a student with locs for refusing to cut his hair, should not be interpreted by employers as a license to implement potentially discriminatory grooming policies, says Dawn Holiday at Jackson Walker.

  • Broadway Ruling Puts Discrimination Claims In The Limelight

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    A New York federal court's recent decision in Moore v. Hadestown Broadway that the employers' choice to replace a Black actor with a white actor was shielded by the First Amendment is the latest in a handful of rulings zealously protecting hiring decisions in casting, say Anthony Oncidi and Dixie Morrison at Proskauer.

  • Breaking Down California's New Workplace Violence Law

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    Ilana Morady and Patrick Joyce at Seyfarth discuss several aspects of a new California law that requires employers to create and implement workplace violence prevention plans, including who is covered and the recordkeeping and training requirements that must be in place before the law goes into effect on July 1.

  • Studying NY, NJ Case Law On Employee Social Media Rights

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    While a New Jersey state appeals court has twice determined that an employee's termination by a private employer for social media posts is not prohibited, New York has yet to take a stand on the issue — so employers' decisions on such matters still need to be assessed on a case-by-case basis, say Julie Levinson Werner and Jessica Kriegsfeld at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • What Texas Employers Should Know After PWFA Ruling

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    After a Texas federal judge recently enjoined federal agencies from enforcing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act against the state of Texas, all employers must still remain sensitive to local, state and federal protections for pregnant workers, and proactive in their approach to pregnancy-related accommodations, says Maritza Sanchez at Phelps Dunbar.

  • AI In Performance Management: Mitigating Employer Risk

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    Companies are increasingly turning to artificial intelligence tools in performance management, exposing organizations to significant risks, which they can manage through employee training, bias assessments, and comprehensive policies and procedures related to the new technology, say Gregory Brown and Cindy Huang at Jackson Lewis.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What 2 Years Of Ukraine-Russia Conflict Can Teach Cos.

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    A few key legal lessons for the global business community since Russia's invasion of Ukraine could help protect global commerce in times of future conflict, including how to respond to disparate trade restrictions and sanctions, navigate war-related contract disputes, and protect against heightened cybersecurity risks, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.