Discrimination

  • July 17, 2024

    Ministerial Exception Ends Buddhist's ADA Suit At 9th Circ.

    The Ninth Circuit backed the dismissal Wednesday of a former Buddhist apprentice's suit claiming his temple failed to accommodate his PTSD, knocking down arguments that the menial work he completed in his role prevented his claims from being nullified by a ministerial exception to anti-bias law.

  • July 17, 2024

    UMich Ducks Black Law Prof's Bias, Retaliation Suit

    A Michigan federal judge released the University of Michigan on Wednesday from a Black law professor's lawsuit accusing the school of harshly disciplining her after she complained about race discrimination, saying she failed to rebut the university's argument that she was punished because she threatened staff members.

  • July 17, 2024

    6th Circ. Skeptical About Nixing Diver's Harassment Verdict

    The Sixth Circuit appeared inclined Wednesday to uphold a $58,000 verdict awarded to a commercial diver who accused an environmental cleanup company of subjecting her to harassment and belittlement, with several judges expressing doubt about superseding the jury's conclusion. 

  • July 17, 2024

    After #MeToo, Report Suggests Judiciary Workplace Reforms

    A report released on Wednesday makes 34 suggested reforms for the federal judiciary to better protect its approximately 30,000 employees, including clerks, building off changes made following the #MeToo movement.

  • July 17, 2024

    Ex-SAP Sales Rep Says It Thwarted His Commission Over Age

    SAP America Inc. canned a software sales representative in his 60s just as he was about to land a million-dollar deal in order to hand off the sale to a younger woman on his team, according to an age discrimination suit filed against the company in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • July 17, 2024

    ADA Can't Shield Worker From Failed Drug Test, Co. Says

    A chemical transportation company urged a South Carolina federal court to toss a former lift operator's lawsuit alleging he was fired for taking legal CBD because of cysts on his brain and spinal cord, arguing disability law doesn't protect workers from positive drug tests for THC.

  • July 17, 2024

    IHOP Owner Strikes Deal To Exit EEOC Religious Bias Suit

    An IHOP restaurant agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve a suit from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing the business of firing a Christian cook because he asked to take Sundays off to attend church, a filing in North Carolina federal court said.

  • July 16, 2024

    Marathon Beats Ex-Worker's Gender Discrimination Case

    A Colorado federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by a former Marathon Petroleum human resources supervisor who claimed she was forced out for inappropriate behavior while male coworkers got a free pass, finding that the supervisor's conduct was worse than the male colleague who she claimed received preferential treatment.

  • July 16, 2024

    Retailer Stood By While Clerk Harassed Women, EEOC Says

    Superstore chain Fred Meyer Stores Inc. failed to stop a male sales clerk from repeatedly harassing, leering at and stalking women he worked with despite numerous complaints, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told a federal court in Washington state Tuesday.

  • July 16, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs Manufacturer Win In Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Seventh Circuit declined Tuesday to reinstate a lawsuit from a Black worker accusing a manufacturing company of firing him in retaliation for complaining about race discrimination with his union, saying there's no error in the lower court's decision despite it relying on his former plant manager's flubbed testimony.

  • July 16, 2024

    9th Circ. Citizen Bias Stance May Spur Hiring Policy Reviews

    The Ninth Circuit recently held that a Reconstruction-era civil rights statute allows American workers to accuse employers in federal court of favoring noncitizens, a ruling that creates a rift with the Fifth Circuit and should prompt companies to tighten their foreign worker recruitment practices. Here, experts discuss three things to know about the Ninth Circuit's decision.

  • July 16, 2024

    Ex-NBA Ref Must Show Psychologist Comms In COVID-19 Suit

    A former NBA referee must turn over records between his psychologist and his counsel to demonstrate whether the league's COVID-19 vaccination policies had the debilitating effect on his psyche that he claims in a lawsuit, a New York federal judge has ruled.

  • July 16, 2024

    Dollar General Strikes $295K Deal To End EEOC Age Bias Suit

    Dollar General has agreed to hand over $295,000 to close a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission age bias suit alleging a regional manager told older district managers he wanted to replace them with younger employees, according to an Oklahoma federal court filing Tuesday.

  • July 16, 2024

    Ex-County Exec Wants Firm Kicked Off NJ Discrimination Suit

    A former New Jersey county health director who claims his termination was retaliatory wants the firm representing the county disqualified, arguing Testa Heck Testa & White PA is conflicted due to interactions he had with two of the firm's attorneys before and during his termination meeting.

  • July 16, 2024

    EEOC Backs Ex-Uber Driver's Bid To Revive Race Bias Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission urged the Ninth Circuit to reconsider a former Uber driver's lawsuit claiming the ride-hailing giant's rating system is racially biased, arguing that a panel's June ruling flew in the face of federal civil rights law and U.S. Supreme Court precedent.

  • July 16, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Adds Employment Ace In Dallas From Ogletree

    Fisher Phillips announced Tuesday that it has upped the headcount at its new Dallas location with a partner who came aboard from Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • July 16, 2024

    The 2024 Diversity Snapshot: What You Need To Know

    Law firms' ongoing initiatives to address diversity challenges have driven another year of progress, with the representation of minority attorneys continuing to improve across the board, albeit at a slower pace than in previous years. Here's our data dive into minority representation at law firms in 2023.

  • July 16, 2024

    These Firms Have The Most Diverse Equity Partnerships

    Law360’s law firm survey shows that firms' efforts to diversify their equity partner ranks are lagging. But some have embraced a broader talent pool at the equity partner level. Here are the ones that stood out.

  • July 16, 2024

    Health System Strikes Deal To End EEOC Race Bias Suit

    A Michigan healthcare system has agreed to pay a Black home health aid $30,000 to resolve a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit alleging she was immediately fired in contradiction with system policy after a white worker accused her of starting a verbal conflict.

  • July 16, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Printing Co.'s Win In Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit refused to reinstate a Black sales worker's lawsuit alleging that a printing company caused his performance to plummet by reassigning him to locations with lower revenues, saying he failed to show the firm was motivated by racial animus when it reorganized its sales department.

  • July 15, 2024

    Male Writer Pans CBS' Free Speech Defense In Bias Suit

    A straight white male worker who claims CBS discriminated against him by repeatedly choosing to hire more diverse candidates for writer roles urged a California federal judge to reject CBS Studios Inc.'s bid to ax the case Monday, arguing that the First Amendment "doesn't per se" shield entertainment corporations like CBS from liability.

  • July 15, 2024

    Calif. Justices Nix 3 Charter Arb. Terms, Remand Severability

    The California Supreme Court held Monday that three of four challenged provisions in Charter Communications Inc.'s employee arbitration agreement are "substantively unconscionable" but remanded a worker's discrimination case back to the trial court to determine if those provisions can be severed and the agreement can still be enforced.

  • July 15, 2024

    School Counselor's FMLA Suit Should Be Tossed, Judge Says

    A Georgia school district should be allowed to escape a former counselor's lawsuit alleging she was terminated for requesting time off to care for her sick husband, a federal judge said Monday, finding she couldn't overcome the district's explanation that she'd failed to correct performance issues despite multiple opportunities.

  • July 15, 2024

    Fired NJ Cops Say ALJ's Ruling Backs Their Off-Duty Pot Use

    An administrative law judge's decision reinstating a Jersey City police officer to her job after she was fired for off-duty marijuana use provides an argument for dismissing the city's lawsuit against the state in which it argues that federal law is at odds with New Jersey law, police officers say in a letter filed Monday in federal court.

  • July 15, 2024

    4 Takeaways As Hiring Bias Suit Over Workday AI Proceeds

    A closely watched discrimination lawsuit over software provider Workday's artificial intelligence-powered hiring tools is headed into discovery after a California federal court ruled the company may be subject to federal antidiscrimination laws if its products make decisions on candidates. Here are four things to know about the latest development in the cutting-edge case.

Expert Analysis

  • Fostering Employee Retention Amid Shaky DEI Landscape

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    Ongoing challenges to the legality of corporate diversity, equity and inclusion programs are complicating efforts to use DEI as an employee retention tool, but with the right strategic approach employers can continue to recruit and retain diverse talent — even after the FTC’s ban on noncompetes, says Ally Coll at the Purple Method.

  • Justices' Title VII Ruling Requires Greater Employer Vigilance

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Muldrow v. St. Louis ruling expands the types of employment decisions that can be challenged under Title VII, so employers will need to carefully review decisions that affect a term, condition or privilege of employment, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 6th Circ. Bias Ruling Shows Job Evaluations Are Key Defense

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    In Wehrly v. Allstate, the Sixth Circuit recently declined to revive a terminated employee’s federal and state religious discrimination and retaliation claims, illustrating that an employer’s strongest defense in such cases is a documented employment evaluation history that justifies an adverse action, says Michael Luchsinger at Segal Mccambridge.

  • Navigating Harassment Complaints From Trans Employees

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent decision in Copeland v. Georgia Department of Corrections, concerning the harassment of a transgender employee, should serve as a cautionary tale for employers, but there are steps that companies can take to create a more inclusive workplace and mitigate the risks of claims from transgender and nonbinary employees, say Patricia Konopka and Ann Thomas at Stinson.

  • Employer Considerations Before Title IX Rule Goes Into Effect

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    While the U.S. Department of Education's final rule on Title IX is currently published as an unofficial version, institutions and counsel should take immediate action to ensure they are prepared for the new requirements, including protections for LGBTQ+ and pregnant students and employees, before it takes effect in August, say Jeffrey Weimer and Cori Smith at Reed Smith.

  • 5 Employer Actions Now Risky After Justices' Title VII Ruling

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    Last week in Muldrow v. St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that harm didn't have to be significant to be considered discriminatory under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, making five common employer actions vulnerable to litigation, say Kellee Kruse and Briana Scholar at The Employment Law Group.

  • Breaking Down EEOC's Final Rule To Implement The PWFA

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    Attorneys at Littler highlight some of the key provisions of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's final rule and interpretive guidance implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, which is expected to be effective June 18, and departures from the proposed rule issued in August 2023.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

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    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

  • Address Complainants Before They Become Whistleblowers

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    A New York federal court's dismissal of a whistleblower retaliation claim against HSBC Securities last month indicates that ignored complaints to management combined with financial incentives from regulators create the perfect conditions for a concerned and disgruntled employee to make the jump to federal whistleblower, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • Why Corporate DEI Challenges Increasingly Cite Section 1981

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    As legal challenges to corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives increase in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on race-conscious college admissions last year, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act is supplanting Title VII as conservative activist groups' weapon of choice, say Mike Delikat and Tierra Piens at Orrick.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

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    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • The Shifting Landscape Of Physician Disciplinary Proceedings

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    Though hospitals have historically been able to terminate doctors' medical staff privileges without fear of court interference, recent case law has demonstrated that the tides are turning, especially when there is evidence of unlawful motivations, say Dylan Newton and Michael Horn at Archer & Greiner.